Category Archives: Growing & Fertilizing Tips

Spring Succulent Rehab

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Remember your gorgeous succulent containers from last summer? Did you take the time to bring in and care for all those tender
plants over the winter? And, now, do they look overgrown and leggy, or a little scruffy to say the least? You have company…mine do too! Here are some suggestions on what to do to give these babies a new lease on life.

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Give your succulents some fresh soil!

First, give your succulents some fresh soil for new roots to grab into. Remember to use a sharp draining mix formulated for succulents…a basic everyday potting soil will stay too moist. Loosen up the roots, and shake off some of the old soil. Remove any old browning leaves that still cling to the lower stem. Repot in the same pot or a pot that is slightly larger.

If you are rehabbing a large container of mixed succulents that were part of an ensemble and want to give it new life, unplant everything and do the same thing. You can top dress the soil with a fine gravel, chicken grit or uncolored aquarium sand, which will prevent low lying foliage from staying in constant contact with moist soil.

Rosette forming succulents often elongate during short winter days and low indoor light, or they may just be prone to doing so anyway, with age. You might like to have the height that tall gangly stem offers, and if so, just leave the plant be. On the other hand you may want to offset the top heaviness. There are a couple of options.

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Aeonium with aerial roots….

Option 1:  Bury Her. Notice that a lot of bracing aerial roots have developed along the stem of this Aeonium ‘Cyclops’. Last year I tried this unorthodox remedy. I found a deep clay container and replanted the Aeonium low in the pot. Succulent soil mix was used  in the lower half, but then I topped the upper pot portion with perlite. This allowed good aeration for new roots to develop off the main stem.

aeonium2

Option 2: Off with her head! This may cause you to hesitate, but you will have to cut off the  Aeonium’s top rosette, (you can then root the rosette to form a new plant).  The stalk will hopefully break anew with fresh growth and branch out, but I should warn you this takes a while to happen.  As for that top rosette, let the cut edge air dry for a few days to “heel” or callous over. Then fill an appropriate sized pot with perlite or a mix of perlite and sand, insert the cut end of the rosette into the pot and water frequently.

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Echeveria with elongated stem

These methods work for elongated Echeveria too. Repot in a tall tom, or cut off the top rosette and try rooting it. Note: You may or may not be able to encourage side rosettes off that main stalk (depends on what type of Echeveria hybrid it is), but hopefully your rosette will root in to form a new plant.

Mystery Echeveria…purchased as 'Fleur Blanc'

Echeveria ‘Fleur Blanc’

Many succulents bloom in late winter and early spring, and these blooms are quite lovely, as seen above in Echeveria ‘Fleur Blanc’. The blooms often help identify plants that you may have acquired without a proper name.

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Look-alikes. x Sedeveria ‘Letitia’ on the left, and ‘Sleepy’ on the right.

For example, these two very similar x Sedeveria are often mixed up in the nursery trade. When not in bloom they do look quite alike.  Now in flower, I can tell that the one on the left is Sedeveria ‘Letitia’ (pale yellow/white) and on the right is Sedeveria ‘Sleepy’ (orange/yellow). Also, notice some plants like these Sedeveria have offsets forming at their base. These offsets can be severed and rooted or potted in small pots if roots have already formed.

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Cuttings left to heel, decayed foliage must go, leaves sometimes root too!

Recap:

  • Cut back leggy growth.
  • Let cuttings air dry for a few days to seal the cut ends.
  • Lie or stick in a sand/perlite rooting media.
  • Groom aging  and decaying foliage.
  • Repot all plants in fresh succulent potting soil to give them a new lease on life.
  • Top dress newly potted succulents with fine gravel, aquarium stone, or chicken grit
  • Note (and photograph if you can) what the flowers look like on your plants to confirm their identity.

With longer days and fresh soil, your repotted succulents will show you how happy they are in 4-6 weeks. Once the weather warms, transition plants outdoors on mild days, first in a spot which has just morning sun, and then gradually allow them full day light. Too much strong sunlight on a warm day after plants have been indoors may cause the leaves to get sunburned.

For other posts on Spring Care of Succulents see:

In bloom: Tender Succulents

Rehabbing Succulent Containers

 

 

 

 

Rehabbing Succulent Planters

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A succulent planter in mid April…ready for rehab.

Those of us who live in colder climates may be thinking it’s time to rehab last year’s tender succulent containers. Over the winter, these planters have been trying to soak up as much sun as possible on windowsills and in sunrooms, but it’s a sure thing that by mid spring many of your plants have become unbecomingly leggy. You have two options: disassemble the planter, plant by plant, then cut back and replant in fresh soil, or if the planter is not overcrowded or out of proportion, you can see if just trimming back is the answer.

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3 weeks later….the plants in this pot have begun to flush with new growth

I’m encouraging you to be ruthless when you cut back. After cutting off their heads these plants won’t look happy immediately, but the alternative could become down right ugly. Any cuttings from pinching can be stuck in sand  and rooted for more plants. You may find that some of the spreading succulents have exceeded their bounds and need to be lifted and divided…. Use these little divisions to tuck in around the container where their are “plant gaps”. Fertilize your planter with a seaweed/fish emulsion. It will take a number of weeks and some warm sunny weather for your planters to start to perk up.

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After cutting back the creepers, replace with fresh cuttings to fill holes and balance the design of your vertical planter.

Vertical Succulent Gardens are often in need of cutting back and editing. We usually leave our vertical planters horizontal on benches during the winter, to minimize stretching.  Still some plants such as the rosettes of Sempervivum or Echeveria may have become overwhelmed by creeping Sedum and Delosperma, and need to be replaced. We take fresh cuttings and secure them in place with floral pins. Fertilize with seaweed/fish emulsion , keeping the wall planter flat while the new cuttings root in, and move outside as soon as nights  stay in the 50’s or above. In a few weeks, growth will begin to fill in the empty spaces, and then you can hang.

Vertical Garden ...3 weeks later

Vertical Garden 3 weeks later

 related posts…:

Wintering Over Tender Succulents

Growing Vertically

A Dreaded Chore: Repotting an Agave

sad, sad Agave

I’ll confess. I had avoided repotting (for almost a year now) what had become one very sad looking Agave.  The older leaves had become brown and ugly, and obnoxious weeds had taken root. The piercing tips and teeth on the leaves looked ferocious, and I didn’t want to give blood. So there it sat, in a neglected corner, a woeful sight indeed.

As we were gathering all the tender plants to bring inside for the winter, it was time to make a choice about whether to save or toss the misbegotten Agave. A decision was made: yes, save it. A plant that has the will to carry on despite such neglect deserves not only respect; it deserves admiration. And as it turned out, grooming and repotting wasn’t a big deal after all. Here’s how we went about it:

The first thing to do is put on some protective gloves. Carefully remove the Agave from its pot, standing over a wheelbarrow or large receptacle to catch the debris. Tilt the plant so you can get at the base of the crown with your clippers and remove the dried up foliage. Next, loosen up the soil around the roots and remove any weeds that may have established, teasing out their roots so they won’t make a comeback.

Use a very well drained soil mix amended with sand and perlite, and if you have access to grit or gravel, add some too. (We don’t add fertilizer, since Agave are very light feeders. Instead, we liquid feed with fish emuslion/seaweed 2 or 3 times a year.) Position the Agave in the center of the pot, and then backfill. The repotting is accomplished, and we can now place the Agave in a spot where it merits attention.

carefully remove old leaves

loosening the roots

Agave, happier looking now

 

Weeping with Wisteria…

Wisteria floribunda 'Blue Eyes'It’s the third week in May, and the Wisteria floribunda ‘Blue Eyes’ which covers our pergola has begun to drip with fragrant blossoms. It’s certainly a sight, and elicits ooh’s and ahh’s from nursery visitors. Conversation immediately turns to pruning advice, and the question we hear over and over again, “Why hasn’t my Wisteria ever bloomed?”

We’ll cover extensive pruning Wisteria advice in a later blog posting, but let me address the flowering question. Wisteria often take several years to bloom after transplanting as it  is concentrating energy on establishing a firm root system, but there are other points to consider. First, plants should receive a good 6 hours or more of sunlight. Also, do not fertilize with a high nitrogen fertilizer. Wisteria are in the legume family, and fix their own nitrogen from soil. Select a fertilizer with a high phosphorus # (the middle number) such as 5-10-10, 5-10-5, or  Espoma’s FlowerTone which is a 3-4-5.

It is advisable to select named clones which have been propagated from productive flowering stock. Wisteria grown from seed are quite variable in their blossom production, and some have been known to never produce a bud. Another thing to consider is that Wisteria sets buds on old wood, and should be pruned  in late spring after flowering (or when it should have flowered) to about 6″ from main branches. One other trick is root pruning in early spring. Using a sharp a spade, dig in about a 2′ radius from the base of the vine. This will sever the roots and may shock the plants into flowering.

Wintering Over Tender Perennial Roots

After a hard frost, unearthed Canna, Salvia, stored Dahlias

This article is appearing before most of us have had a killing frost, but take a moment to read this now so you’ll have an idea of what to do when the time comes. The processes described below are general and reliable instructions, but we’ve had luck simply wintering over dormant plants in the containers they were grown in, stored in cool, dark spaces which stay above 35F.

WAIT UNTIL AFTER there has been a killing frost, when the foliage has blackened and in some cases toppled over (you want to be sure active growth is halted). Then it is time to gently unearth the corms, tuberous roots and rhizomes of tender perennials such as Canna, Colocasia, Oxalis, Gladiolus, Dahlia, Salvia guaranitica, Mirabilis, Phygelius and others. Be careful, as cuts and breakage of fleshy tubers invite disease and decay. (If pieces of root become broken or cut, remove the affected divisions or treat with a garden fungicide to prevent fungal diseases from developing and spreading.) It is always a wise practice to sterilize shovels and forks after digging each clump, so as not to spread disease. Remember to write on a tag each variety of plant as they are dug, and attach. It is so easy to mix up root stocks, especially if you’re growing more than one selection of a certain plant.

The next thing you should do is clean and cure your roots. Wash off with a hose sprayer as much of the clinging soil as possible, which will rid you of possible pests and pathogens lingering in the soil. You may want to dip the clean roots in a fungicide solution at this point as a preventative action. (We may try the botanical all purpose Neem this year, which has fungicidal properties as well as insecticidal.) Lay the roots to cure or dry in a protected well ventilated area out of direct sunlight. This may take a few days or up to a week or two, depending on the plants, weather and temperature conditions.

In the meantime, locate some ventilated containers to store the roots, such as wooden crates or apple baskets. Plastic covered bins are easy to acquire, but be sure to puncture holes in the sides for ventilation. Be sure to include a label in each bin. First put down an insulating layer of clean wood shavings, almost dry peat moss, a well drained barky soil mix which is just a tad moist, or even sand, and lay down the roots, covering each layer with an inch of your medium, being careful to not to let the roots touch. Place the bins in a dark cool area that stays above freezing. A cool, slightly humid root cellar would be perfect, and if you live in an ancient house like we do, your cellar may be the perfect spot. Any basement, shed or garage that is dimly lit and cool will be fine, as long as it stays above freezing. You may want to check the bins occasionally to monitor if  mold is beginning to develop. If you do catch fungal problems, immediately discard the affected roots and remove what is left that look healthy. Treat the healthy roots with a fungicide, (acts as a preventative) and place in a clean bin with fresh shavings, soil mix or sand.

Making Your Bed for Spring III

Should you lime your garden?

Here in the northeast, we seldom consider the effects of acid rain anymore.  Since most public water departments deliver water with a neutral ph, the effects of acid rain have been largely neutralized in landscapes that use public water.  Still, we cant be certain of the soil pH unless we periodically test it. it is a good idea to purchase soil pH testers, either online or at a local garden centers.

Making Your Bed For Spring I

Tending to Hellebores in March

One of the first things we tackle in the garden is raking up windblown leaves that have accumulated around the crowns of the early blooming Lenten Roses (Helleborus orientalis hybrids) and removing last year’s tarnished foliage, which may harbor pesky Botrytis spores.

As you cleanup the decaying growth, you may be fortunate to discover dozens of tiny seedlings at the plant’s base (of course that’s if the Hellebore bloomed well for you last year).  These seedlings may be variable in color, especially if you’re growing a hybrid selection or more than one variety. You can always leave them undisturbed, and a few will eventually establish in situ or you can very gently lift the delicate seedlings and transplant them into small pots using a well drained potting soil. After a few months they will have put on enough growth for transplanting to other spots in your garden.