Wintering Tender Plants Indoors

Suddenly, one morning you wake up, and the chill in the air alerts you that autumn has unofficially arrived. Once the nighttime temperatures begin to dip into the 40’s, it’s time to start bringing plants indoors, beginning with those that are only hardy to the warmer zones 9, 10 and 11. (Think some Alpinia, Coleus, Cuphea, Acalypha, Alternanthera, Cyperus, Impatiens, etc.) If available space is a concern, be selective and choose the hardest to acquire specimens first. Do you have a warm space available that is well lit and humid enough for tropicals, such as a bathroom or laundry room? Remember that indoor heating systems create a warm but dry air environment. Plants that prefer more arid conditions, such as tender succulents, Pelargonium, and some Begonia easily adapt to the transition indoors.

Important! Here are two things you should do first. The days are getting shorter and there is less light available indoors. Plants will begin to respond to the change in temperature and light by dropping foliage, and in some cases flower production ceases. To counter the low light levels, we recommend trimming back large leafy plants so there is less growth for the plants to support. Also, inspect plants for insect activity and as well as burrowing snails, slugs and other hitchhikers. Spray with a botanical pest control, such as insecticidal soap or Neem. Spray again in 7-10 days to arrest any late hatching, and monitor in the weeks to come.

Plants that are hardy to zones 7 and 8 can handle cool winter temperatures in the 35-40 degree F. range, and will do well in a sunny attic, basement or garage. These plants include Abutilon, Phormium, Fuchsia, Phygelius, Hebe, Coprosma, Astelia, Centaurea, many Salvia and Pelargonium, to name a few. Remember that since their growth has slowed down due to lower light levels, stop fertilizing and water just enough to keep them from drying out, since  constantly wet soil contributes to root rot.

Next week’s article: Storing dormant roots.

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