September Report: Containers 2016

acylinderpot_fall2016

a winner…the tall cylinder pot aged gracefully, don’t you think?

Here it is, the very end of September 2016, and at last we are finally getting the rain we’ve begged for all summer. Good thing, but I’ve been waiting for a cool crisp sunny day to capture images of the end of the summer containers, and with a prolonged rainy spell in the forecast I probably should not wait any longer. As you would guess after a summer bereft of rainfall, the containers planted with succulents and drought tolerant plants held up beautifully. In my July 1st post I posted the “before ” shots.  Now for the “after images”.  First are the top five, in my humble opinion, plus more of the before and after images shown side by side.

aironurn_fall2016

The cast iron urn, with Beschorneria ‘Flamingo Glow’ and other succulents, grew in a spot with about 4 hours of midday sun.

Really really love the Agave substitute Beschorneria ‘Flamingo Glow’.

agreendrum2_fall2016

The green drum pot, with Phormium ‘Evening Glow’ and more assorted succulents: x Graptoveria, Echeveria, Aeonium, Senecio, and more.

I’m suddenly realizing that areas which once in more sun are now getting more shade. Interesting to discover which succulents still do well.

asignpot_fall2016

Out by the road, and under our sign, a spot with heat, and little attention. Succulents again rule.

agrecianurn500

the Grecian Urn received only a few hours of early morning sun: Two types of Asparagu ferns, a silver leaved Sansevieria, Begonia ‘Concorde’ and Alternanthera

And now for the side by side transformation after 3 months….

xcylinder

Cylinder Pot 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

xironurn

Iron urn 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

xdrumpot

Green Drum Pot 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

xsignpot

Sign Pot 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

xgrecianurn

Grecian Urn 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

xhummerspot

Hummer’s Pot 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

Planted with Hummingbird visitors in mind, the Phygelius bloomed tirelessly, but is now at its end. The Fuchsia gave up during the August heat, but the Abutilon ‘Kentish Bell’ picked up where the others left off.

xgrassbowl

Splendor in the Grass Bowl 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

This grass combo in a big bowl with Chocolate Cosmos and Ornamental Oregano held on right through August, but the Cosmos needed consent deadheading, and the Heuchera became smothered by the Stipa and Carex.

xwinterberrypot

Winterberry Pot 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

This planter only gets a few hours of midday sun…but the combination of tall Sansevieria, Aeonium ‘Kiwi’, and Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’ thrived. The small dark Aeonium Tip Top, melted, so I replaced it with a silver green Echeveria.

xzenbowl72

Zen Bowl 6.29.16 and 9.29.16.

The Zen bowl gets only afternoon sun. Everything grew well, but we are still waiting patiently for the orange tassel blossoms of the Senecio ‘Blazing Glory’ to provide an end of the season show.

xtrough

Footed Trough 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

Hypertufa troughs are usually planted with alpines, but  they are also great containers for smaller succulents. On its own, this planter isn’t a superstar, but it worked very nicely as an accent on the ledge of Chris Tracey’s stone wall.

stonewall2_500

xlatticeplanter

Terra Cotta Planter 6.29.16 and 9.29.16

This 18″ planter does not look worse for wear after a lengthy drought. Again, succulents rule!

Was your summer as hot and dry as ours here in New England? What container plants held up best for you?

8 thoughts on “September Report: Containers 2016”

  1. Beautiful arrangements and really fun to see the before and after images. I was going to try to pick a favorite, but they were all so stunning and each lovely in their own surroundings.

    In regards to your two questions, yes, it was definitely dry in New England where I live too, and I haven’t done container gardens in awhile, maybe next year after being inspired by yours.

  2. All of these containers look beautiful, but it would also be helpful to see the ones that did NOT do well (assuming there are any!). My containers did OK, except for that one coleus that pushed every other plant out of the pot. I chronically underestimate how big a coleus can get.

  3. Thank you for your comment Michal, and in response I think that, and this is a matter of personal opinion, the Grasses Gone Wild container wasn’t as successful for the end of the season show, although it might have been better if we kept up with the deadheading. Our objective is to focus on plant and combinations that are unique, EASY to care for, and not only last but are even more beautiful at season’s end.

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