Tag Archives: shade containers

Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’

Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ just beginning to bloom

Plectranthus is a large genus from South Africa, related to Coleus. This selection, ‘Mona Lavender’, was bred at Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden in Cape Town, S Africa in the 1990’s and was introduced into the US market by Ball Horticultural. Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ is a stunning plant bearing dark green foliage with eggplant purple undersides. She teases you with an occasional bloom in summer months, but we have found here in southern New England that it is not until  late August when the real display begins. Multitudes of lavender throated flowers are held in upright spires providing a show that continues right until frost.

Grow Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ in rich soil in sun or partial shade. Plants branch quickly when pinched, and this encourages a compact form. ‘Mona Lavender’ generally reach 18-24″ for us, but may get 2-3′ in a climate with a longer growing season. (Customers in Florida wholeheartedly give this plant a thumb’s up). We love using her in containers where her dark foliage adds contrast, and surprise from the late flush of blossoms. Alas she is only hardy to 35 degrees, so when frost is predicted, you may want to bring ‘Mona Lavender’ indoors. She might be very happy spending the winer on your sunny window sill.

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Plectranthus ciliatus

You might pass by this plant and think, hmm…that’s an interesting Coleus with its old gold/khaki colored leaves. Turn the leaf over and note the purple coloring. It is in fact a member of the Labiatae (mint) family which of course means it related to Coleus (Solenostemon). Its claim to fame in our book, besides its attractive foliage, is the especially striking flower display presented in late summer and early fall.

Plectranthus ciliatus is native to forested areas of southern Africa, is hardy to about 35 degrees F and can tolerate quite a bit of shade. It can grow 2′ tall, but it has lax stems that will root along if planted in open ground. We suggest that you should offer it at least a few of hours of sun, since the sunlight will induce an abundance of spires of large lavender pink flowers on the decumbent stems in late September through October.

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Container Combo for Dry Shade

Begonia, Pilea and Tahitian Bridal Veil

Again, it is so much about the foliage. The angel wing leaves of Begonia ‘Sinbad’ are really a soft celadon green veined in rose, but have a silvery cast. On close inspection, the silvery effect is due to the pebbly texture formed by the tiny raised white leaf segments. Simple, sweet pink flowers dangle from the leaf axils.  For filler, the tiny white variegated foliage of little Pilea, commonly called artillery fern, creates a frothy effect beneath the bolder leaves of ‘Sinbad’ and the casual abandon of Gibasis geniculata , also known as Tahitian Bridal Veil, with its two tone green/purple foliage and white baby?s breath blossoms finish off the combination.

Culturally, use a well drained potting soil, amended with Osmocote. Begonias do not want to live in soggy soil, so monitor watering by allowing the soil to dry out a bit. This ensemble would enjoy morning or filtered light, and would be a suitable arrangement for a covered porch, where the minimal watering needs can be monitored.

Pilea microphylla ‘Variegata’

Expand your repertoire of container plants for shady situations. Little variegated Pilea also known as Tricolor Artillery Fern has dainty white variegated leaves, often tinted pink, which are displayed in a spray like fashion on fleshy succulent stems. Plants grow to a height of perhaps 6″ spreading to 8-10″ and work as an airy filler in container combinations. Often sold as a selection for terrariums, Pilea prefer a sunny window if grown indoors, but outside, bright shade seems to be its perfect growing situation. She needs little care except as needed watering.

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Fuchsia triphylla ‘Gartenmeister’

What a workhorse! This plant always looks terrific. Beloved by hummingbirds for his endless supply of long tubular salmon-red flowers, this upright bushy Fuchsia has handsome velvety dark green tinted purple bronze foliage. ‘Fuchsia Gartenmeister’, also known as ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’, in honor of it’s hybridizer, can reach a height of 2-3′, but can be pinched back if a shorter stature is desired, and can grow to a width of 18-24″ in one season.

We recommend growing ‘Gartenmeister’ in morning sun/afternoon shade, although we have grown this plant in a very sunny spot, where the flower supply was even more generous. Use a  rich well drained soil and keep well watered. Fertilize container grown plants bi weekly. Plants are winter hardy in very warm climates (zone 10) but can be easily wintered over indoors, should you wish to keep plants for next year.

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