Tag Archives: shade containers

End of the Season Containers

senecio_blazingglory72 (1 of 1)It’s been over 3 months since I posted the “Before” Container Shots. We’re now into October, and luckily the weather has been mild, with a few chilly nights. All in all, the containers depicted in the early summer post are looking as good if not better.  My goal each year is to come up with combos that are easy care and will look fabulous until frost.  Here are this year’s end of the season shots.zenbowl_detailazen_bowlt_9302017oct72Succulents rule! The Aeonium noticeably is more green than bronzy, and  this space where the 36″ Zen Bowl is located is getting more and more shade…perhaps now only getting 3-4 hours of afternoon sun…it’s getting limited for succulents. I think we’ll have to reconsider what type of plants to use here next year.aaeoniumpot_9302017_72The Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ in the drum pot, with Sedeveria ‘Harry Butterfield’ and String of Pearls spilling over the sides, is still looking pretty awesome. I will be sad when we have to dismantle this container.cylinderpot2017The Cylinder Pot in front of the garage is pretty much doing a repeat performance of last year. The big Kalanchoe beharensis started to overwhelm his neighbors, and was trimmed back several times.white_pots17_72The larger white pot with Cuphea ‘David Verity’, Digiplexis ‘Illumination’ and Ruellia b. ‘Purple Showers’ needed watering attention, but is still blooming away. Not missing a step,  the smaller pot continues to look good with Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’, Phormium and Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost’.xgreekurnThe Grecian Urn on the pedestal was one of the shade ensembles, with Begonia ‘Art Hodes’, Cyperus ‘Starburst‘, Oxalis, and Callisia congesta variegata, which needed to be cut back more than once. I know, I know, I put way too many ingredients in this pot.silverfernpot17_72Here’s another shade planter, mixing hardy and tender plants. Maidenhair Fern, Black Mondo Grass and hardy Begonia grandis, are paired with tender Sansevieria ‘Moonshine’ and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’. This planter was in dappled shade all day, and notice how well the Dichondra grew!
papyrus (1 of 1)Papyrus + Papyrus  + Callisia = … To begin with, I selected too small a pot in June, so what did I do?  In mid summer, I lifted the plants that had filled the pot and moved them into a much bigger container. When the Ornamental Oregano had done her thing, then the Callisia was very happy to take over the pot.ironurn17 (1 of 1)One of the iron urns is getting more shade than in previous years… probably just 4 hours of good sun, and then it’s in dappled light. Here is what it looks like now… the Beschorneria and Golden Ivy seem happy still.whitebegonia_72Someone bought the head pot…so I can’t show how it fared, but instead here is another shady planter. Never took the “before” picture, but I thought this green trough was successful. The white form of Begonia boliviensis seemed happier this year than in the past, and is paired with trailing Pilea glauca, Pilea microphylla variegata, Ornamental Oregano, and  Blue Rabbit’s Foot Fern, which is now pretty much hidden.brownterrabowl17 (1 of 1)Last but not least, the brown terra cotta bowl wants to show off even more now that it is autumn. Assorted succulent foliage looked great all summer. Now, in October, the  Euphorbia tirucalli (Sticks on Fire) is beginning to deepen in color and Senecio ‘Blazing Glory’, bursting forth with orange red blossoms, is ending the season with a bang.

What easy care combinations worked best for you this summer? Have you been using succulents in your container plantings?

Containers 2017…the before shots

Here it is the end of June, and the most of our containers are planted. These are  low maintenance ensembles: the goal is to have them still looking  fine at September’s end, with minimal care during the summer. As you might expect, foliage plants, especially succulents, play a big role because of their reliable good looks.

6_27_17zenbowl72You’ve seen this pot before, but each year I vary the ingredients. This year the 36″ Zen Bowl has an interesting collection of Graptoveria, Aeonium, Euphorbia, Sedum and Senecio.

zdrumpotaeoniumwebThe green drum pot boasts a specimen Aeonium hybrid with x Sedeveria ‘Harry Butterfield’ and Senecio rowleyensis (String of Pearls).

zgaragepots500Again, the tall cylinder pot in front of the garage has a repeat performance  with a few of last year’s plants…Kalanchoe behartii, Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ , Echeveria ‘Swirl’, x Graptosedum ‘California Sunset, Senecio ‘Mini Blue’, a Rhipsalis and silver leaved Dichondra.

whitepotsjune2017For a sunny spot….some tender perennials with flower power. Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’ is not hardy for us in the ground, but it is a long summer bloomer in pots. Ruellia ‘Purple Showers’ adds some dark contrast with foliage plants Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’, Heuchera ‘Caramel’, and Hedera ‘Amber Waves’ adding long season interest. The smaller pot to the right has Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’, Phormium ‘Sundowner‘, and Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost’, with a matching Hedera.

zgrecian_urn500This 20″ wide Grecian urn is in quite a bit of shade, so I’ve used the variegated dwarf Papyrus Cyperus ‘Starburst’, with dark purple leaved Oxalis, Begonia ‘Art Hodes’, Sansevieria ‘Moonshine‘ and trailing over the sides, Callisia congesta variegata

zvesselferndicondra_shade500New pot, new spot. Green, silver and black color scheme. Dappled shade all day. Used Maidenhair Fern Adiantum pedatum, with Sansevieria ‘Moonshine’, Black Mondo Grass Ophiopogon planiscapes Nigrescens, Begonia grandis, which will get big and add height as the summer goes on, and I’m trying out Dichondra in the shade. We shall see…

papyrus2017_juneThe 14″ green planter has both a green and a variegated dwarf papyrus, with Ornamental Oregano Origanum rotundifolium ‘Kent Beauty’  and Callisia congesta variegata. The dusky plum leaved plant on the right is Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’ .

ironurn2017_juneThe False Agave Beschoneria ‘Flamingo Glow’ is accented with ivies and oxalis…Hedera ‘Amber Waves’ and congestifolia, plus Oxalis ‘Iron Cross’ in the iron urns which get only 3 hours of afternoon sun.

headpot2017_juneA simple planting of hardy Sempervivum ‘Pacific Blue Ice’ with  teensy creeping Sedum sexangulare are just the right plants for the small planting cavity of this face pot.
brownterracottapot_june2017I can just tell this brown terra cotta bowl is going to be outrageous when fall arrives…the succulents used include Sticks on Fire Euphorbia tirucalli rosea, Senecio ‘Blazing Glory’, Crassula ‘Hummel’s Sunset’ Sedum ‘Firestorm’, and String of Pearls, Senecio rowleyensis. 

Check back for more images in the end of September report.

Asparagus Ferns to Know and Grow

Perhaps your grandmother had a big hanging basket of Asparagus Fern on her shady porch…you probably didn’t think much about it, but there it lived, thriving with little care, living in the same pot for what seemed to be years on end. Yes-sir-ree…a testimony to a plant which could thrive on neglect.

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Just planted….Asparagus setaceus plumosa, with 2 begonias in an 8″ square pot.

Despite their fernlike ambience, this group of foliage plants are not ferns at all, but members of the Lily family (Liliaceae). An inspection of the root system reveals a mass of bulb-like tubers, (think lily bulbs). Being pot bound doesn’t discourage their vigor and although they like bright light, Asparagus Ferns can exist satisfactorily with quite a bit of shade. They do not need a constant supply of moisture, and prefer a soil that is sharp draining. Take note: Asparagus Ferns make great companions to Begonia  which like similar conditions… bright light to shade, and a soil that doesn’t stay wet.

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Asparagus densiflorus ‘Sprengeri’ (L) and densiflorus ‘Myersi’ (R)

The most familiar species is A. densiflorus ‘Sprengeri’, known for it’s arching stems of apple green narrow leaves. (For those who need to be on top of all things botanical…the genus is now Protasparagus, but that may be too much information for some. ) The next most commonly encountered form is the Foxtail Asparagus, A. densiflorus ‘Myersi’, with its  gorgeous chunky plumes.

Now, let me introduce you to  a few siblings, which offer variety but require the same easy care, and of course are suitable as cut greenery for arrangements.

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Clockwise from upper left: A. densiflorus ‘Cwebe’, A. setaceus plumosa, A. setaceus pyramidalis, and A. macowanii

Asperagus densiflorus ‘Cwebe’ is not dissimilar to Grandma’s form, but ‘Cwebe’ tends to be more upright, growing, to 18-20″ tall, and has an interesting bronze tint to the new growth. Asparagus setaceus plumosa is  very lacy,  and is familiar to those who purchase cut greens for arranging.  Asparagus setaceus pyramidalis also has lacy, fine textured foliage with an upright thrust. Perhaps the sweetest of all is Asparagus macowanii, commonly called Ming Fern, with very delicate forest green foliage. As a young plant A. macowanii  is quite small in stature, but if grown in a conservatory or outdoors where it is hardy, it can reach a height of 5’ at maturity.

The before shots…containers 2015

In early summer, I take “before” images of my containers and then “after” shots in September to document how well the compositions fared over the season.  The plant selection for each arrangement is based on great foliage and unique forms. Flowering plants must be long blooming but without the constant need of deadheading.  Here are a dozen “before” pics.

For sunny and partial sunny areas….

Tall Cylinder Pot: Melianthus major, Verbena bonariensis, Heuchera 'Southern Comfort', Sedim 'Lemon Coral', Lantana montevdensis and Tradesantia 'Pale Puma'

Tall Cylinder Pot..Melianthus major, Coprosma, Verbena bonariensis, Heuchera ‘Southern Comfort’, Sedum ‘Lemon Coral’, Lantana montevdensis and Tradesantia ‘Pale Puma’

California Hydrangea Pot: Unknown Hydrange, Origanum 'Kent Beauty', Oxalis triangularis, Abutilon 'Pink Charm'

California Hydrangea Pot: Lovely, but unknown Hydrangea, Origanum ‘Kent Beauty’, Oxalis triangularis, Abutilon ‘Pink Charm’

Not flower bud hardy for us outdoors in zone 6A, but love the coloring of this dwarf hydrangea we purchased on a trip to CA a couple of years ago.

Closeup of the Hydrangea, which influenced color selection. This hydrangea, purchased on a trip to CA a couple of years ago, (don’t think it’s ‘Pistachio’), is not flower bud hardy for us outdoors in zone 6A, but makes a great container specimen.

Cast Iron Urn: The friendly agave relative, Beschorneria 'Flamingo Glow' with Cuphea hyssopifolia aura, Pelargonium sidoides, Variegated Ivy and Tradescantia 'Pale Puma'

Cast Iron Urn, starring the friendly agave relative, Beschorneria ‘Flamingo Glow’ with Cuphea hyssopifolia aurea, Pelargonium sidoides, Variegated Ivy and Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’

Detail, showing Cuphea hyssopifolia aura and Pelargonium sidoides

Detail, showing Cuphea and Pelargonium sidoides

Hummer's Pot: hummingbird magnet Cuphea 'David Verity' with Heuchera'Southern Comfort, Oxalis 'Zinfandel', Coleus 'Tapestry' and Helichrysim 'Limelight'

Hummer’s Pot: Hummingbird magnet Cuphea ‘David Verity’ with Heuchera ‘Southern Comfort’, Oxalis ‘Zinfandel’, Coleus and  Helichrysum ‘Limelight’

White Bean Pot: Gaura 'So White, Pelargonium sidoides, Heuchera 'Obsidian'and Dicondra 'Silver Falls'

White Bean Pot: Gaura ‘So White’, Pelargonium sidoides, Heuchera ‘Obsidian’, Lantana montevidensis alba and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’

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Charcoal Urn: Pink Stripe Phormium, with a variety of succulents and Dicondra ‘Silver Falls’

And for more shady spots…

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A living wreath  (sort of a vertical container) for shade: Mini Spider Plant (Chlorophytum ‘Bonnie’ )

 

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Abutilon ‘Pink Charm, again, with Heuchera ‘Beaujolais, Pilea microphylla variegata, Fuchsia ‘Madame Daishu’ and the barely seen Ceropegia woodii (String of Hearts Vine)

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Amorphophallis konjac with big Begonia ‘Wild Pony’ and petite Begonia bowerae. 

And of course: Succulents…I’ll try not to bore you with too many!

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A new succulent combination for the 32″ black zen bowl…(there are too many plants to list).

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Succulent Martini anyone?

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Fan favorite Succulent Clam Shell.

Which container planting can you see in your garden?

PS…Check back in September to see which containers till look fabulous.

Ligularia x ‘Last Dance’

A wintry mix of weather blew into town this week, but Ligularia ‘Last Dance’ didn’t want the waltz to end. This recent introduction from Itsaul Plants looked smart all season with glossy bronze purple round foliage accented by slightly pointed lobes. To add Halloween contrast, it sent forth bright yellow composite flowers in October and is still blooming away as of 11/14. Hardy and tropical looking…hmm. First disclaimer…it did winter over in our zone 6 garden last year, but during the coldest period we were blanketed with snow. Ligularia x ‘Last Dance’ is a hybrid of  Ligularia (Farfugium) hiberniflora and Farfugium japonicum, two species from Japan and Taiwan, but the Farfugium japonicum can’t be trusted in zones colder than 7.

Ligularia ‘Last Dance’ is being marketed with plant tags saying it is hardy into zone 4. I’m thinking this is a stretch. Reports from commercial growers say it is growing and wintering in Zeeland, Michigan (Zone 6) and Philadelphia (Zone 7).  If you do want to grow this for its end of the season burst of color, here is the data: Foliage height is about 12″ high, and can grow to 2-3′ wide. Yellow blossoms are held on 1-2′ stems. It does well in sun or partial shade in a moist soil, but seems as happy in average conditions.

I think this season I will put down a winter mulch to protect my investment. Should it prove not to be zone 6 hardy, I say it should get 100 points for being a stunning container plant. Would love to hear from anyone else who is growing  Ligularia ‘Last Dance’.

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Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’

Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ just beginning to bloom

Plectranthus is a large genus from South Africa, related to Coleus. This selection, ‘Mona Lavender’, was bred at Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden in Cape Town, S Africa in the 1990’s and was introduced into the US market by Ball Horticultural. Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ is a stunning plant bearing dark green foliage with eggplant purple undersides. She teases you with an occasional bloom in summer months, but we have found here in southern New England that it is not until  late August when the real display begins. Multitudes of lavender throated flowers are held in upright spires providing a show that continues right until frost.

Grow Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’ in rich soil in sun or partial shade. Plants branch quickly when pinched, and this encourages a compact form. ‘Mona Lavender’ generally reach 18-24″ for us, but may get 2-3′ in a climate with a longer growing season. (Customers in Florida wholeheartedly give this plant a thumb’s up). We love using her in containers where her dark foliage adds contrast, and surprise from the late flush of blossoms. Alas she is only hardy to 35 degrees, so when frost is predicted, you may want to bring ‘Mona Lavender’ indoors. She might be very happy spending the winer on your sunny window sill.

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Plectranthus ciliatus

You might pass by this plant and think, hmm…that’s an interesting Coleus with its old gold/khaki colored leaves. Turn the leaf over and note the purple coloring. It is in fact a member of the Labiatae (mint) family which of course means it related to Coleus (Solenostemon). Its claim to fame in our book, besides its attractive foliage, is the especially striking flower display presented in late summer and early fall.

Plectranthus ciliatus is native to forested areas of southern Africa, is hardy to about 35 degrees F and can tolerate quite a bit of shade. It can grow 2′ tall, but it has lax stems that will root along if planted in open ground. We suggest that you should offer it at least a few of hours of sun, since the sunlight will induce an abundance of spires of large lavender pink flowers on the decumbent stems in late September through October.

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Container Combo for Dry Shade

Begonia, Pilea and Tahitian Bridal Veil

Again, it is so much about the foliage. The angel wing leaves of Begonia ‘Sinbad’ are really a soft celadon green veined in rose, but have a silvery cast. On close inspection, the silvery effect is due to the pebbly texture formed by the tiny raised white leaf segments. Simple, sweet pink flowers dangle from the leaf axils.  For filler, the tiny white variegated foliage of little Pilea, commonly called artillery fern, creates a frothy effect beneath the bolder leaves of ‘Sinbad’ and the casual abandon of Gibasis geniculata , also known as Tahitian Bridal Veil, with its two tone green/purple foliage and white baby?s breath blossoms finish off the combination.

Culturally, use a well drained potting soil, amended with Osmocote. Begonias do not want to live in soggy soil, so monitor watering by allowing the soil to dry out a bit. This ensemble would enjoy morning or filtered light, and would be a suitable arrangement for a covered porch, where the minimal watering needs can be monitored.

Pilea microphylla ‘Variegata’

Expand your repertoire of container plants for shady situations. Little variegated Pilea also known as Tricolor Artillery Fern has dainty white variegated leaves, often tinted pink, which are displayed in a spray like fashion on fleshy succulent stems. Plants grow to a height of perhaps 6″ spreading to 8-10″ and work as an airy filler in container combinations. Often sold as a selection for terrariums, Pilea prefer a sunny window if grown indoors, but outside, bright shade seems to be its perfect growing situation. She needs little care except as needed watering.

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Fuchsia triphylla ‘Gartenmeister’

What a workhorse! This plant always looks terrific. Beloved by hummingbirds for his endless supply of long tubular salmon-red flowers, this upright bushy Fuchsia has handsome velvety dark green tinted purple bronze foliage. ‘Fuchsia Gartenmeister’, also known as ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’, in honor of it’s hybridizer, can reach a height of 2-3′, but can be pinched back if a shorter stature is desired, and can grow to a width of 18-24″ in one season.

We recommend growing ‘Gartenmeister’ in morning sun/afternoon shade, although we have grown this plant in a very sunny spot, where the flower supply was even more generous. Use a  rich well drained soil and keep well watered. Fertilize container grown plants bi weekly. Plants are winter hardy in very warm climates (zone 10) but can be easily wintered over indoors, should you wish to keep plants for next year.

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