Tag Archives: succulents

Containers 2017…the before shots

Here it is the end of June, and the most of our containers are planted. These are  low maintenance ensembles: the goal is to have them still looking  fine at September’s end, with minimal care during the summer. As you might expect, foliage plants, especially succulents, play a big role because of their reliable good looks.

6_27_17zenbowl72You’ve seen this pot before, but each year I vary the ingredients. This year the 36″ Zen Bowl has an interesting collection of Graptoveria, Aeonium, Euphorbia, Sedum and Senecio.

zdrumpotaeoniumwebThe green drum pot boasts a specimen Aeonium hybrid with x Sedeveria ‘Harry Butterfield’ and Senecio rowleyensis (String of Pearls).

zgaragepots500Again, the tall cylinder pot in front of the garage has a repeat performance  with a few of last year’s plants…Kalanchoe behartii, Aeonium ‘Cyclops’ , Echeveria ‘Swirl’, x Graptosedum ‘California Sunset, Senecio ‘Mini Blue’, a Rhipsalis and silver leaved Dichondra.

whitepotsjune2017For a sunny spot….some tender perennials with flower power. Digiplexis ‘Illumination Flame’ is not hardy for us in the ground, but it is a long summer bloomer in pots. Ruellia ‘Purple Showers’ adds some dark contrast with foliage plants Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’, Heuchera ‘Caramel’, and Hedera ‘Amber Waves’ adding long season interest. The smaller pot to the right has Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’, Phormium ‘Sundowner‘, and Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost’, with a matching Hedera.

zgrecian_urn500This 20″ wide Grecian urn is in quite a bit of shade, so I’ve used the variegated dwarf Papyrus Cyperus ‘Starburst’, with dark purple leaved Oxalis, Begonia ‘Art Hodes’, Sansevieria ‘Moonshine‘ and trailing over the sides, Callisia congesta variegata

zvesselferndicondra_shade500New pot, new spot. Green, silver and black color scheme. Dappled shade all day. Used Maidenhair Fern Adiantum pedatum, with Sansevieria ‘Moonshine’, Black Mondo Grass Ophiopogon planiscapes Nigrescens, Begonia grandis, which will get big and add height as the summer goes on, and I’m trying out Dichondra in the shade. We shall see…

papyrus2017_juneThe 14″ green planter has both a green and a variegated dwarf papyrus, with Ornamental Oregano Origanum rotundifolium ‘Kent Beauty’  and Callisia congesta variegata. The dusky plum leaved plant on the right is Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’ .

ironurn2017_juneThe False Agave Beschoneria ‘Flamingo Glow’ is accented with ivies and oxalis…Hedera ‘Amber Waves’ and congestifolia, plus Oxalis ‘Iron Cross’ in the iron urns which get only 3 hours of afternoon sun.

headpot2017_juneA simple planting of hardy Sempervivum ‘Pacific Blue Ice’ with  teensy creeping Sedum sexangulare are just the right plants for the small planting cavity of this face pot.
brownterracottapot_june2017I can just tell this brown terra cotta bowl is going to be outrageous when fall arrives…the succulents used include Sticks on Fire Euphorbia tirucalli rosea, Senecio ‘Blazing Glory’, Crassula ‘Hummel’s Sunset’ Sedum ‘Firestorm’, and String of Pearls, Senecio rowleyensis. 

Check back for more images in the end of September report.

As summer ends…

stonewall2_500

A+ rating for drought tolerance…Yucca ‘Color Guard’ with Jackman’s Blue Rue, Succulents, Sedums and dwarf conifers. Oh yes, and the amazing yet vicious Solanum quitoense.

Not sure if I am truly sorry to see the summer of 2016 end. There have been days that I’ve thought that an early frost would be a blessing as I dragged hoses about, trying to coax vibrancy into a garden getting more tarnished looking by the day. The forecast for rain never proved to be true, and the number of very hot days set a record. Still, the optimistic gardener within always wins out. Yesterday, I walked about the garden to see what plantings held their own despite the cursed weather. Here’s what I saw.

hydrangea_peewee500

The Oakleaf Hydrangea ‘Peewee’, with flowers aging to russet brown, but with fresh foliage, despite no irrigation.

crambe_maritima91916-1

Crambe maritima (Sea Kale) thrived, and swallowed up the younger plants nearby.

agastache_blackaddeer540

Agastache ‘Black Adder’, with nearby Amsonia hubrictii beginning to turn golden for fall.

lespedeza_gibralter_fall2016-1

Deep rooted Lespedeza ‘Gibralter’ could have cared less about the drought.

eucomisdarkstar540

Little Eucomis ‘Dark Star’, petty in flower and in leaf, with nearby red Heuchera

signpot1_540

Succulents by the road fended for themselves admirably

giant_pumpkin_fall2016-1

Fruit finally formed during  the 3rd week of August on the giant pumpkin. We’ll see…..

cutflowers_fall2016-1

Our overly ambitious cut flower garden….did I know I wouldn’t have extra time for fresh arrangements, ands  planted Celosia and Gomphrena which could also be cut and then dried?

zinnia_queenlime_fall2016-1

You are not seeing the mildewed foliage (intentionally), of the lovely Queen Red Lime Zinnia…

dahlia_detail-1

The blush pink beauty of Dahlia ‘Cafe au Lait’

And so, as I prepare for fall, certainly all was not lost. The garden gave us butterflies and bees, and yes, beauty, in addition to many challenges.  I am game for next year…are you?

Containers 2016, the Before Shots

iron_urn_detail-1I always think I’ll get my containers planted by Memorial Day, but that doesn’t happen often, so I shoot for the Fourth of July. My goal each season is to come up with fresh combinations that are easy care and will still be looking sweet in September.  Of course, I use a lot of succulents because they always deliver. Here are the end of June images. Check back for the end of September shots.

agrassbowl2016_500

Grasses gone wild pot…Stipa tenuissima, Carex flagellifera , Chocolate Cosmos, Heuchera ‘Champagne’, Oregano ‘Kent Beauty’ and Sedum ‘Angelina’

a_iron_urn2016

Iron urns…succulent mix of Beschorneria, Aeonium, Sedum mackinoi ‘Ogon’, Crassula and String of Pearls Senecio

a_embossed_planter_succulents500

Succulents in Embossed Terra Cotta: Crassula argentea variegata, Sedum adolphi, Graptosedum ‘Alpenglow’ and Senecio ‘MIni Blue’ with sedum mackinoi ‘Ogon’

a_footed_trough500

Hypertufa Low Planter with Succulents: Echeveria imbricata and ‘Black Prince’, Senecio lineare, Sedum mackinoi, and x Sedeveria ‘Hummelli’

a_sign_pot2016_500d

Under the Sign Pot (a hot neglected area): Succulent mix…Aeonium ‘Kiwi’, Sticks on Fire Euphorbia, Senecio cylindricus, Aeonium ‘Zwartkopf’ and ‘Lilypad’, String of Bananas Senecio and Sedum mackinoi ‘Ogon’

drumPot2016-1

Drum pot with Phormium ‘Evening Glow’and assorted succulents

drumPot2016_detail-1

Succulent Detail: Echeveria ‘Swirl’ with Aeonium , x Graptoveria ‘Debby , Graptopetalum hybrid and Blue Leaved String of Bananas

tall_pot1_300

Tall Pot with Melianthus major, Kalanchoe behartii, Senecio cylindricus, Echeveria hybrid, Aeonium urbicum and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’

winterberry_pot2016-1

Out of the way pot  (always forget to water!): Sansevieria, Aeoniums ‘Kiwi’ and ‘Tip Top’ with Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’

zenbowl2016-1

35″ Zen Bowl with Succulents (as always.)..but with a new mix.

aphygeliusPot500

For hummers and part shade: Abutilon ‘Kentish Bell’, Fuchsia ‘Debron ‘Black Cherry’, Phygelius ‘Sunshine’, Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’, Heuchera ‘Steel City’ and Hedera ‘Amber Waves’

begonia_BN_white-1

Also for pt. shade: a new white Begonia boliviensis from seed, plus Eyelash Begonia and Asparagus Fern (Plumosa)

a2016greek_urn-1

For a Shady spot (gets a little early morning sun) Asparagus densiflorus myersii and densiflorus ‘Cwebe’ with a short Silver Sansevieria, Begonia ‘Concorde’ and trailing purple Alternanthera….

San Diego Plant Cache!

Mike Kartuz, with our box of Begonias.

Mike Kartuz, with our box of Begonias.

Lucky us! Chris and I booked it out of MA just before the deep freeze earlier this month and caught some rays in San Diego, where our oldest son Phil now lives. And, since our business is our pleasure (PLANTS!), we always make it a point to visit a few regional growers of rare succulents and begonias.

A must stop for us was Kartuz Greenhouses in Vista. Mike Kartuz, who is 88, left Massachusetts 4 decades ago to grow tropicals, especially Begonias, in a much kinder climate. Mike, along with “begonia volunteer” Brad Thompson (check out Brad’s Begonia webpage) have hybridized some of the most fascinating Begonias we have come across. Plants are sold in 2” pots, and they ship when the weather permits, but we always find selections on our visit that never make it to the Kartuz website.

Brad Thompson talking plants with Chris

Brad Thompson talking plants with Chris

Our next excursion was into the hills of Fallbrook to meet up with Dick and Kraig Wright, who breed Echeveria and Aloe  almost exclusively. Dick who is also 88, has been hybridizing Echeveria since the 1950’s, and if you have collected a few Echeveria you no doubt have at least one of his hybrids. Some of Dick’s most coveted selections are named after family members; we came home with Arlie Wright, named for Dick’s mother,  plus many, many more.

closeup of Echeveria 'Arlie Wright'

closeup of Echeveria ‘Arlie Wright’

While Dick and Kraig are still seeking out unique “Ech” forms with impressive size, they are experimenting more and more with miniature Aloe, which command premium prices in Japan and Korea. I was astonished that the Wrights do not hold patents on their selections but make them available to collectors who can try their own luck at propagating. Here is a link to their website .

Preparing newly acquired plants for travel

Preparing newly acquired plants for travel

After visiting these gents, we figured we almost had a full suitcase but that didn’t mean we couldn’t look a little more. The San Diego area nurseries are well stocked and we wanted to see if we could possibly identify some forms that were mislabeled or nameless when we acquired them. We asked  and took label images but still left with questions!!!

At another nursery, 2 different Echeveria tagged Arlie Wright ..the one on the right is someone else!

At another nursery, 2 different Echeveria tagged Arlie Wright ..the one on the right is someone else!

Plants being sold with incorrect names are a big problem, and we do understand how easily it can happen. Many look very different in their youth than they will at maturity, and changes to foliage color occur with different temperatures and humidity.  Oh, well…Phil and his girlfriend Annique seem to really like San Diego living, so we have good excuses  to return and fit in more plant i.d. excursions,

Winter Prep for Tender Succulents

sucpotfall500_72As we advance into autumn, your succulent planters may look so beautiful that  you may want to wait until the last minute to protect your plants.

deconstruct1_succulent500It usually happens sometime in mid October in southeastern MA,  when a cloudless night will allow temperatures to drop into the low 30’s and a light frost nips unprotected tender plantings (yep, that’s what happened here). If a frost catches you by surprise, your plants may only have suffered slight foliage damage which can easily be trimmed off.

deconstruct2_succulent500Small containers can simply be moved inside, but you’re probably not going to want to move a big heavy pot. The only thing to do to preserve your plants in this case is to dismantle your planting. Carefully pry loose the root balls to get at the plants. (Thanks  Peter Tracey for acting as our model!)

deconstruct4_succulent500

Have a wheelbarrow nearby to transfer your unearthed roots.

deconstruct6_ssucculent500Prepare a very well drained planting medium suitable for succulents. We use a barky perennial mix with added perlite and coarse sand. It is important that your plants don’t spend the winter in soil which stays moist all the time. Try to transplant into pots that are just big enough to contain the root ball. (This will help keep the pots on the dry side and will not take up much space.)

deconstruct_succulents.onPlace your pots near the sunniest windows in your home. The days are getting shorter and low light levels may can cause your plants to stretch towards the window. Rotate your pots to compensate.  We water only when the pots are dry, and wait until late winter or early spring to fertilize.

See the Rehabbing Succulents Post for spring care.

The Other Hardy Hens & Chicks

jovhuef

Jovibarba heuffelii with small Sempervivum, Echeveria & Orostachys in the background.

The most familiar hens and chicks are in the genus Sempervivum. I’d like to introduce you to the  less familiar with same common name which are classified in the genera Jovibarba, Orostachys and Rosularia.  All are members of the Crassulacea family.

A rosette of Sempervivum flowering

A rosette of Sempervivum flowering, but with a number of offsets surviving.

Like Sempervivum, all are monocarpic, which means when the main rosette erupts into flower, it will set seed and cease to exist. (You can see why it is a good thing that many offsets of new plantlets have been freely produced.)

jovhsa2

Jovibarba hirta ssp arenaria

The genus Jovibarba is sometimes classified as a sub genus of Sempervivum.  Jovibarba is distinguished by blossoms bearing pale green to yellow 6 petaled flowers compared to Sempervivum’s 10-12 petaled pink blossoms. There are only 3 species in the genus: globifera, hueffeli and hirta. J. globifera and hirta freely produce stoloniferous offsets but  J. heuffelii’s “chicks” are tightly attached to the crown, and need to be severed to propagate more babies. J. hirta ssp arenaria  forms dozens of delightful miniature rosettes (1/4-3/4”) of pale gray green leaves covered with tiny hairs. Cool temperatures bring out red foliage highlights. Grow in a lean soil with sharp drainage in hardiness zones 5-9.

orospin

Orostachys spinosus

oromin

Orostachys minutum

Orostochys is a slightly bigger genus…it includes the more popular O. iwarenge (Dunce caps) as well as several others that are garden worthy subjects. The mature rosette of O. spinosus gives the appearance of a silver sunflower with an array of silver quilled foliage surrounding a center of congested tiny tight leaves. It is hardy to zone 4-9, but requires very well drained soil. O. minutum (also listed as O. spinosum minutum) is quite petite as the specific name suggests, producing clusters of 1/2-1” rosettes of blue gray foliage. It  would make an excellent alpine trough plant.

rosmur

Rosularia muratdaghensis

rosser

Rosularia serpentinica

roschry

Rosularia chrysantha

The genus Rosularia includes about 35 species. We have grown R. muratdaghensis, R. serpentinica, and R. chrysantha. Both R. muratdaghenis and serpentinica form tight mounding rosettes of gray green foliage, accented with red tones in cooler temperatures. R. chrysantha has a mat forming habit,with rosettes of soft velvety green leaves. All 3 species demand lean soil with excellent drainage and are are hardy in zones 5-9.

The before shots…containers 2015

In early summer, I take “before” images of my containers and then “after” shots in September to document how well the compositions fared over the season.  The plant selection for each arrangement is based on great foliage and unique forms. Flowering plants must be long blooming but without the constant need of deadheading.  Here are a dozen “before” pics.

For sunny and partial sunny areas….

Tall Cylinder Pot: Melianthus major, Verbena bonariensis, Heuchera 'Southern Comfort', Sedim 'Lemon Coral', Lantana montevdensis and Tradesantia 'Pale Puma'

Tall Cylinder Pot..Melianthus major, Coprosma, Verbena bonariensis, Heuchera ‘Southern Comfort’, Sedum ‘Lemon Coral’, Lantana montevdensis and Tradesantia ‘Pale Puma’

California Hydrangea Pot: Unknown Hydrange, Origanum 'Kent Beauty', Oxalis triangularis, Abutilon 'Pink Charm'

California Hydrangea Pot: Lovely, but unknown Hydrangea, Origanum ‘Kent Beauty’, Oxalis triangularis, Abutilon ‘Pink Charm’

Not flower bud hardy for us outdoors in zone 6A, but love the coloring of this dwarf hydrangea we purchased on a trip to CA a couple of years ago.

Closeup of the Hydrangea, which influenced color selection. This hydrangea, purchased on a trip to CA a couple of years ago, (don’t think it’s ‘Pistachio’), is not flower bud hardy for us outdoors in zone 6A, but makes a great container specimen.

Cast Iron Urn: The friendly agave relative, Beschorneria 'Flamingo Glow' with Cuphea hyssopifolia aura, Pelargonium sidoides, Variegated Ivy and Tradescantia 'Pale Puma'

Cast Iron Urn, starring the friendly agave relative, Beschorneria ‘Flamingo Glow’ with Cuphea hyssopifolia aurea, Pelargonium sidoides, Variegated Ivy and Tradescantia ‘Pale Puma’

Detail, showing Cuphea hyssopifolia aura and Pelargonium sidoides

Detail, showing Cuphea and Pelargonium sidoides

Hummer's Pot: hummingbird magnet Cuphea 'David Verity' with Heuchera'Southern Comfort, Oxalis 'Zinfandel', Coleus 'Tapestry' and Helichrysim 'Limelight'

Hummer’s Pot: Hummingbird magnet Cuphea ‘David Verity’ with Heuchera ‘Southern Comfort’, Oxalis ‘Zinfandel’, Coleus and  Helichrysum ‘Limelight’

White Bean Pot: Gaura 'So White, Pelargonium sidoides, Heuchera 'Obsidian'and Dicondra 'Silver Falls'

White Bean Pot: Gaura ‘So White’, Pelargonium sidoides, Heuchera ‘Obsidian’, Lantana montevidensis alba and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’

brownurn2015_500

Charcoal Urn: Pink Stripe Phormium, with a variety of succulents and Dicondra ‘Silver Falls’

And for more shady spots…

spider.wreath

A living wreath  (sort of a vertical container) for shade: Mini Spider Plant (Chlorophytum ‘Bonnie’ )

 

pinkcharmpot500

Abutilon ‘Pink Charm, again, with Heuchera ‘Beaujolais, Pilea microphylla variegata, Fuchsia ‘Madame Daishu’ and the barely seen Ceropegia woodii (String of Hearts Vine)

amorphophallis_500

Amorphophallis konjac with big Begonia ‘Wild Pony’ and petite Begonia bowerae. 

And of course: Succulents…I’ll try not to bore you with too many!

zenbowl_500

A new succulent combination for the 32″ black zen bowl…(there are too many plants to list).

succulent.martini

Succulent Martini anyone?

succulent.shell2015_500

Fan favorite Succulent Clam Shell.

Which container planting can you see in your garden?

PS…Check back in September to see which containers till look fabulous.

In Color: Hardy Succulents

Clockwise from left: Sempervivum 'Pacific Blue Ice', Sedum 'Angelina', Semeprvivum 'Carmen', Sedum album 'Coral Carpet', Sempervivum 'Topaz', and Sedum stefco

Clockwise from left: Sempervivum ‘Pacific Blue Ice’, Sedum ‘Angelina’, Semeprvivum ‘Carmen’, Sedum album ‘Coral Carpet’, Sempervivum ‘Topaz’, and Sedum stefco

It is early April here in New England, and as the snow retreats, a walk about the garden reveals color from unexpected plants…winter hardy succulents. Yes the early crocus and snowdrops are showing off, but they will come and go quickly. Since we’re still flirting with frosts and will not begin to see rich greens and bright pastels until the end of the month, the delicious burgundy and coral tones taken on by many hardy Sempervivum and Sedum provide a different color palette. These hardy succulents may not grab your attention when plant shopping, since many gardeners aren’t selecting plants at nurseries until warmer temperatures prevail. By late spring, the intense foliage hues change to more muted blue green and olive coloring. And of course, there are many more brightly colored blossoms to distract us.

If you’re taking a survey of your gardens right now, consider where you can use the rich, changing colors and textures that winter hardy succulents provide. They require minimal care and look good year round, especially the “evergreen” forms. Many are hardy into zone 3 plus are deer and rabbit resistant.  They ask only for sun and good drainage, and can winter over admirably in containers as well.

The receding snow (we had over 3′ at one point) did not harm Sempervivum ‘Carmen’ in the least.

The receding snow (we had over 3′ at one point) did not harm Sempervivum ‘Carmen’ in the least.

In bloom: Tender Succulents

graptoveria fred ives

Flowers of Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’

Most of us select our ‘tender” succulents by virtue of their unique forms or foliage in desert tints of sage green, blue gray, dusty rose, plum, khaki gold. A few put out flowers during our northern hemisphere summers, but many warm winter succulents bloom when the day length is shorter…mid-late fall, winter, and early spring.  These succulents add astonishing color to a windowsill display while we wait for spring to really settle in.

aloes in bloom

A peak at some of our Aloes in bloom.

gasteraloe

Gasteraloe ‘Green Ice’…a cross between an Aloe and Gasteria

I’ve been collecting “tender succulents” for more than 15 years, and one of the frustrating things I constantly come across are mislabeled plants. We now have an excuse to visit southern CA more frequently as one of our sons is living there, and since this is where more succulents are grown than anywhere else, I have made it my mission to visit botanical gardens and nurseries from Santa Barbara to San Diego in search of proper names. The most common succulent genera are Aloe, Crassula, Echeveria, Gasteria, Graptopetalum, Kalanchoe, Pachyphytum and Sedum.

What makes things very curious is that there’s been a lot of inter breeding going on, and by that I mean crossing one genus with another. For example, Echeveria crossed with Sedum becomes Sedeveria.  Because these genera are so closely related (many are in the Crassulaceae family) this works, and some interesting new plants have been introduced. This does however complicate identifying misnamed plants. The foliage isn’t always the tell tale sign; the flower formation can give better clues, but even then…take for example Graptoveria ‘Moonglow’, a cross between Graptopetalum and Echeveria.

graptoveria moonglow

Graptoveria ‘Moonglow’

The flowers of Echeveria tend to be bell shaped with many variations: tightly closed, flared, chunky, narrow and are held on short or even tall stems that can be terminated with a few blossoms or multi branched. Graptopetalum blossoms are star shaped with prominent stamens and are held on upright stems in branches of a few to many flowers. The flowers of Sedum are held in terminating clusters of star shaped inflorescences. The intergeneric crosses display a mix of these flower formations, and here is where further research is required. I plan to continue to study the differences.

sedum limeglow

Sedum ‘Limeglow’

Photo documentation is essential in keying identity. I now have a set up for plant portrait taking, and will continue to photograph the various flower forms as  plants continue to open bud.  Here are a few photos of various succulents in flower.

echeveria dondo

Echeveria ‘Dondo’

Mystery Echeveria…purchased as 'Fleur Blanc'

Mystery Echeveria…purchased as ‘Fleur Blanc’

mystery echeveria

Mystery Echeveria…also purchased as ‘Fleur Blanc’

moonstones

Pachyphytum oviferum…or “Moonstones”

echeveria lola

Echeveria ‘Lola’

Echeveria parva

Echeveria parva

harry butterfield

Sedeveria ‘Harry Butterfield’

sedeveria

Mystery Sedeveria

sedeveria

Sedeveria blossom

I have yet to find an authoritative source, online or in print, documenting and clarifying information on succulents. It is a challenging task, for sure. Do you have a resource or guide you refer to? Please share if you do.

 

Pumpkin Succulent Arrangements

 

whitepumpkin.web

I have a confession. I am obsessed with pumpkins and gourds, and can’’t drive by a farm stand without stopping and selecting a bushel full to add to my collection. To me, they are sculpture in an amazing array of forms, sizes, shapes and textures. Those of you who have followed this blog or have visited Avant Gardens know that one of my other obsessions is succulents. I wasn’’t the first arranger to think of combining these obsessions, but clearly gourds and succulents pair well.

Timing couldn’’t be better. With frost imminent, I have just dug dozens of succulents out of pots in the garden and will soon run out of space in the greenhouse. As an advocate of the “Slow Flower” movement, extolled in Debra Prinzing ‘s book by the same name, I’m always looking for ways to use plant materials in arrangements which are in season and on hand in my garden or windowsill. Thinking that  you might want to create your own succulent arrangement, I’m passing on this quick tutorial.

pk172

Materials needed: a pumpkin or gourd, dry long fiber sphagnum moss, floral pins, spray adhesive and tacky glue, plus an assortment of succulents in an array of shapes and sizes in coordinating colors (that’s not hard..most coordinate so well with each other.)

pk2moss

First, use the spray adhesive on the top of the pumpkin so that the sphagnum moss can cling to it, and loosely extend the moss over the crown. (Note: I didn’t do this here, but would recommend removing the pumpkin stem). The moss acts as the “planting medium”, and will later be sprayed with water to hold moisture. Next, using floral pins and if necessary, tacky glue, secure the trailing succulents onto the moss.

pk4.5.we

Next begin to add the larger succulent cuttings, like the rosette forming Graptoveria shown here. Apply a little bit of the tacky glue to the base of the stem and carefully arrange in the moss, using a floral pin to secure in place. Continue with the smaller succulents to fill in the bare spots. It will take awhile for the tacky glue to securely dry, so let the arrangement rest overnight, and check the next day to see if the cuttings seem well attached. If a few stems are loose reapply glue. Carefully transfer your pumpkin to a spot where all can admire it.

whitepumpkin.web

Your arrangement will look terrific for weeks. The succulents will hold up well for awhile without water, but you can mist the arrangement with water if they become a little shriveled. The sphagnum moss will hold just enough moisture to keep the arrangement fresh. Since you are not hollowing out the pumpkin, the fruit will not quickly decay (as hollowed out pumpkins tend to do).  The little pin pricks from the floral pins do minimal damage. Keep the arrangement in a bright cool spot (too much warmth and darkness will encourage decay).

You may find 6 weeks from now that your gourd or pumpkin is beginning to go bad, but the succulent cuttings are still fine. Remove them from the arrangement and try to root them in a tray of sand and perlite, if not already rooted.  Keep them in a sunny window and you just may have a collection of plants for next year’s garden.

Purchase Cuttings for Arrangements.