Tag Archives: good for wildlife

Ruellia brittoniana ‘Purple Showers’

Sometimes your garden needs something tall, something blue. The abundant display of summer perennials laden with yellow daisy-like flowers begs for plant selections which offer dark contrast.

A “temperennial” here in zone 6, Tall Mexican Petunia won’t winter over outdoors for us, but it certainly will in zones 8-10. Still, we always make room for it in our gardens and also use it in container combinations where the tall 3-4′ purple stalks are clothed with narrow dark green purple tinted foliage. The continuous display of violet blue funnel shaped flowers extend on short stems from the leaf axils, and attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.

Ruellia ‘Purple Showers’ does enjoy evenly moist soil, and will even grow well along a pond?s edge or in low standing water, a situation that can be challenging. This does not mean it won?t grow in average soil conditions, for it will, but it does not want to fry.  Southern nursery catalogs list Ruellia as an evergreen shrub. We suspect Ruellia may become territorial in warm climates, and should be planted where its vigor is an asset.

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Sorbaria sorbifolia ‘Sem’

First, we fell in love with the foliage. The new foliar growth is a delicious shade of caramel pink, gradually becoming lime green as the summer progresses. As the July heat intensifies, 4-6″ panicles of white pearly buds burst into creamy Astilbe like plumes. Sorbaria sorbifolia ‘Sem’ is a compact growing False Spirea, growing only to 48″, unlike the species which can reach 8′ or more.  ‘Sem’ will give you moderate height without obscuring your view. Yes this form will sucker and form a thicket…but that is why you should use this shrub as a low hedge, or for filling a space that you don’t want to fuss over.

Here are the other pertinent facts: Sorbaria ‘Sem’ grows in full sun or part shade, is deer resistant and is hardy to minus 35 degrees F. Pretty and tough, don’t you think?

Meehania cordata

What has spring time blue flowers, grows 4-6″ tall, spreads by creeping runners, thrives in partial shade or shade in moist or drier soil? Meehania cordata, commonly known as Meehan’s Mint! This versatile and underused Northeast native is a good substitute groundcover for Lamium and Ajuga. It blooms in May and June with violet blue lipped tubular blossoms and would make a lovely underplanting for golden leaved Hosta and Hakonechloa (Japanese Forest Grass).

Although it is especially vigorous in moist soil, and would be a good choice for carpeting along a pond or stream, it will also grow well but more slowly in drier spots. It is hardy in zones 5-8 and would be a welcomed addition to a wildflower garden.